Chayote and Pineapple Chimichangas
Makes 8 servings A chimichanga is essentially a fried burrito, so this recipe starts with a homemade tortilla dough. Don't be intimidated (also don't be afraid to substitute prepared burrito-sized tortillas)! The dough comes together easily for a tender, crisp exterior. The filling is made up of chayote, a tender gourd popular in Latin American…

CIA FOODIES


Chayote and Pineapple Chimichangas

Makes 8 servings A chimichanga is essentially a fried burrito, so this recipe starts with a homemade tortilla dough. Don't be intimidated (also don't be afraid to substitute prepared burrito-sized tortillas)! The dough comes together easily for a tender, crisp exterior. The filling is made up of chayote, a tender gourd popular in Latin American cuisine. If you cannot find chayote, you can substitute summer squash, like zucchini or pattypan.

Ingredients

Chayote and Pineapple Filling
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cups small-dice onions
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon minced jalapeño, seeds and ribs removed
  • 3/4 cup small-dice red peppers
  • 1 1/3 cups small-dice yellow peppers
  • 1/2 cup small-dice roasted poblanos
  • 3 cups small-dice chayote, peeled and seeded
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels
  • 1 cup small-dice pineapple, fresh cored and peeled
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon coriander
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 recipe Chimichanga Dough
  • 4 cups grated Monterey Jack or Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup vegetable oil, plus more as needed, for frying

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and garlic and sauté until translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the jalapeño and red and yellow peppers; sauté just until they begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add the poblanos and chayote and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the corn, pineapple, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, and cayenne; sauté until heated through, about 3 minutes. Remove the pan from heat, and mix in the cilantro and parsley. Season with the salt and pepper.
  2. Divide the chimichanga dough into 16 equal pieces and roll each piece into a ball. Cover the dough balls with a towel to prevent them from drying out as you work. Working with one ball of dough at a time, flatten the dough into a disk with the palm of your hand and then use a rolling pin to roll it into a 10-inch tortilla. Repeat until all of the dough is rolled out into 10-inch tortillas.
  3. To fill the chimichangas, mound about 1/3 cup of the filling and 2 tablespoons cheese in the center of the tortilla. Fold in the sides of the tortilla and then roll up the chimichanga from the top down. Transfer the filled chimichanga to a platter or baking sheet, seam side down.Continue until all the chimichangas are filled and rolled.
  4. Add enough peanut oil to skillet to come to a depth of 1/2-inch. Heat the oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Place four chimichangas in the pan at a time and pan fry, seam side down, until the undersides are golden, about 2 minutes.Turn over with tongs and panfry until all sides are golden brown and crisp, about 6 minutes more. Transfer to paper towels to drain briefly; keep warm on platter in a 300°F oven. Panfry the remaining chimichangas in the same manner.

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