Chef's Notes Plus

What I’m Cooking: Herb-Rubbed Roasted Pork

This recipe is really more about the rub than the roast, since it’s all-purpose and surprisingly versatile. Inspired by the seasoning typically used in porchetta, this rub is incredibly flavorful on its own, but a chameleon when paired with virtually any ingredient. Meaning you can eat a dish like this […]

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How to: Roast Vegetables without a Recipe

As we ease into autumn, we can finally celebrate the return of roasting—especially vegetables. We love roasting because it is one of the most delicious ways to enjoy seasonal fall produce, like hard-skinned squash, cauliflower, fennel, and Brussels sprouts (color = flavor), as well as incredibly easy and hands-off. Even […]

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Purchasing Shrimp

Shrimp is an easy-to-cook protein, not to mention delicious (shrimp cocktail will never go out of style), but can be sort of confusing to pick out. So many sizes and names, not to mention the choice between farm-raised and wild-caught. Keep reading for a quick refresher on the must-knows for […]

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Simple Syrup

Keeping a jar of simple syrup in your pantry may seem like a waste of space, but once you have it, you’ll reach for it more than you think. And sure, you can buy a bottle of prepared simple syrup for many dollars, but it’s sort of absurdly easy and […]

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From the Garden: Basil Vinaigrette

I absolutely cannot keep a plant alive. Not even the easy ones, like aloe, even though I really try. The only plant that survives my path of destruction is basil, which is really a yearly tale of resilience. Now it’s mid-August, and for those of us who don’t know how […]

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What I’m Cooking: Lemon Baked Pasta with Broccoli Rabe

I haven’t always embraced my Italian-American identity. That’s not to say I’m not proudly Italian-American, or that I’m somehow ashamed of my Italian ancestry. It was more the Jersey Shore Italian-American stereotype that sort of haunted me, even before MTV entered the conversation. On campus at The Culinary Institute of […]

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All About Tofu

Tofu, also called bean curd, is made by coagulating (or curdling) soy milk before pressing it into semi-firm blocks. The process, similar to that of cheesemaking, results in tofu of various textures, ranging from scoopable to sliceable, all useful in different kitchen applications, both sweet and savory. Tofu is very […]

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Make Creamy Salad Dressings without a Recipe

As salad dressings go, oil and vinegar—their cute couple name is Vinaigrette—are sort of the popular kids. Everyone likes them, they get along with anyone/salad, and here’s where this metaphor falls apart: you don’t need a recipe. But sometimes a salad and/or your brain are just begging for a creamy […]

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New Video: Perfect Fried Eggs

Sometimes the classic, tried-and-true way just doesn’t work for you. For me, I was always hung up on the perfect fried egg. Sunny-side-up, runny yolk with a little bit of texture, crisp underneath, and set–not runny–whites. I knew the tricks. After all, I did learn from the best at the […]

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Heirloom Recipes from the CIA

You can cook a lot of food in more than 70 years, and here at The Culinary Institute of America, we’ve created some tasty dishes, if we do say so ourselves. Whether they were imagined right here on our campus or inspired by some of our favorite old-world classics, there […]

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Wine 101: Chardonnay

Great food and wine go hand in hand, but when the-things-to-know-about-wine are seemingly infinite, it can be difficult (and intimidating!) to choose a wine. In this series, we’ll explore the fundamentals of wine, from grape varietals to tasting, so that you can tackle a wine list with confidence. Up first […]