Measuring spoons on white surface
It's a popular topic of conversation in the baking community: volume or weight? Many say ingredients should be measured by weight, no question. It is more accurate and more convenient (less dirty dishes!). But in the U.S., most recipes (ours included) for home cooks and bakers are written using volume measurements like cups and tablespoons.…

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Volume or Weight: How do the Measurements Measure Up?

It's a popular topic of conversation in the baking community: volume or weight?

Many say ingredients should be measured by weight, no question. It is more accurate and more convenient (less dirty dishes!). But in the U.S., most recipes (ours included) for home cooks and bakers are written using volume measurements like cups and tablespoons. This is because, unlike elsewhere in the world, homes in America generally do not keep a kitchen scale, making grams or ounces unhelpful for those accustomed to measuring with spoons and cups. Of course, with the globalization of food and the ease of finding recipes online, many American recipe developers and brands are finding the opposite problem: many outside the U.S. don't have the tools to make our recipes.

Here at the CIA, we see value in both options, and in our kitchens, you will see our chefs and students using a combination of volume and weight measures, since both have their benefits. One is not better than another, but one may be better for YOU.

Of course, we wouldn't want your preference to stand in the way of following a great recipe. Ideally, your kitchen would be stocked with a reliable kitchen scale and a set of both dry and wet volume measuring tools. But if that isn't the case, here are a few common baking ingredients and their equivalents for helpful recipe conversions.

Anything missing? Leave a comment below and we'll help you with the conversion!

Chart of common recipe conversions

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