Rustic bread
Malted barley is called for in many of our bread recipes (as malt syrup) because of its impact on the dough. Malt is made by separating the enzymes that break down starch into sugar from cereal grains, usually barley. Many flours are treated with malts at the mill, but organic and whole wheat flours often…

CIA FOODIES


Using Malt in Breading Baking

Malted barley is called for in many of our bread recipes (as malt syrup) because of its impact on the dough. Malt is made by separating the enzymes that break down starch into sugar from cereal grains, usually barley. Many flours are treated with malts at the mill, but organic and whole wheat flours often are not. Diastatic malted barley contains an enzyme that helps break down the flour’s carbohydrates into sugars, making them more available to the yeast. This allows the yeast to do a better job fermenting, generally making for a lighter and tastier loaf of bread. It also helps the bread’s color and improves dough handling. This is the preferred version for all-purpose bread baking. Non-diastatic malted barley does not contain enzymes. It contributes flavor and color, but it less preferred than diastatic. If you can’t find diastatic malted barley right away, you can make the bread recipes without it. Simply omit it, no need to substitute. Once you locate it, however, you will see a difference. It comes in syrup or powdered form. You can use either, but our recipes are tested using syrup. The syrup should be added to your liquids. The powder should be mixed in with the flour.

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